Blinken OSA Archivum
HU OSA 368-1 Documentation of Sociological Research Projects and Other Works
BookIconSubfonds Description
Context
Hierarchy
Statistics
Identity Statement
Title
Documentation of Sociological Research Projects and Other Works
Identity Statement
Date(s)
1937 - 2010
Identity Statement
Description Level
Subfonds
Identity Statement
Extent and medium (processed)
28 Archival boxes, 3.5 linear meters
Content and structure
Scope and content (abstract)
István Kemény’s academic work started with a paper entitled The Road of Our Peasantry, published under the pen name Áron Máté in 1946. He started to work intensively in the field of social sciences in this period. However, sociology was banned in Hungary in 1948 and Kemény could start working as a sociologist only in 1963. Kemény regarded law scholar Jenő Gyula Pikler (1864-1937), architect Aladár Sós (1887-1975), historian István Hajnal (1892-1956) and sociologist Zoltán Szabó (1912-1984) as his professional “ancestors”, the two first being followers of economist Henry George (1839-1897). Kemény’s choice of land value tax as his topic and individualism as methodology are clear signs of George’s influence. The so-called Kemény School evolved from a series of seminars on methodology, launched in 1969, challenging scientific and public taboos. These seminars were held by Kemény illegally and became an important center of alternative intellectual movements in the late 1970s. News of the events spread rapidly among young intellectuals interested in social sciences and soon attracted the attention of state security organizations. As a result, Kemény definitively lost his post at the Institute of Sociology in 1972, which had been insecure anyway since 1970 because of a speech on poverty at the ceremonial session of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. The seminars took place at different venues and with different audiences. The earliest ones focused on research into the behavior of top managers of enterprises, and were attended by economists Tamás Bauer, Mihály Laki, Aladár Madarász, Károly Attila Soós, philosopher Zoltán Endreffy and sociologist Gyula Kozák. Participants at the later seminars were carefully selected on the basis of professional aptitude. Parallel with a representative research project on the Roma, a study of poverty was conducted; the two grew into one large-scale seminar including participants who were not part of the research projects, for instance sociologists Gábor Havas, Ottilia Solt, Kálmán Rupp, Zsolt Csalog, Péter Galasi, László Kardos, Erika Törzsök, Anna Román, György Göndör, Gabriella Lengyel, Magda Matolay, János Ladányi, Júlia Szalai, János Dávid and Zoltán Zsille. After Kemény’s emigration in 1977 others joined the group of his disciples even though they had never attended the seminars, while sociologists faithful to the regime avoided these meetings, considering them as a training course on how to become a revolutionary. Although this was denied by Kemény, one outcome of the seminars was the establishment of the Foundation for Supporting the Poor in 1979. By 1976 István Kemény was forbidden to conduct any research at all, even under cover of someone else’s name, and he emigrated to Paris in January 1977. He was a researcher at the Écoles des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales from January 1978 to September 1990. In this period he focused on social theory and social history issues, and worked on the publication of the findings of his earlier research projects in Hungarian, English and French. In the 1980s various branches of sociology in Hungary adapted Kemény’s approach to their own topics and after a decade the terms social mobility, poverty, work organization, labor market and second economy made their way into the lexicon of official social sciences. According to some, Kemény broke taboos by pointing out that society has a dual structure: one is forcibly constructed by the state, while parallel with it there exists another which is founded on the organic continuation of traditions. The first series of the sub-fonds includes the documentation of the social stratification research conducted together with Zsuzsa Ferge in 1963. The second series consists of the material of the research project on the living conditions of low income earners. The third series documents the national representative research on the Roma of 1971, 1993 and 2003. The fourth series includes the documents of the research on top managers of enterprises, which was classified for a long period. The fifth series is made up of the documents of sociological and economic research on the living and working conditions of industrial workers. The sixth series includes the transcripts of interviews conducted within the framework of the research project on small entrepreneurs after the regime change. The seventh series is made up of the documents of other research projects, mostly on economic, sociological and historical topics. The most important are the papers on the theory of land value tax based on Henry George’s work, on Jews in the 19th century, and the history of Hungarian society.
Content and structure
Appraisal, destruction and scheduling information
During the course of processing no materials have been removed.
Content and structure
Accruals
Not Expected
Conditions of access and use
Conditions governing access
Not Restricted
Conditions of access and use
Physical characteristics and technical requirements
The series contains paper documents of good physical condition.
Notes
Various branches of sociology in Hungary in the 1980s adopted Kemény’s approach to topics and after a decade the terms social mobility, poverty, work organization, labor market and second economy made their way into the lexicon of official social sciences. According to some, Kemény broke taboos pointing out that society has a dual structure: one is forcefully built by the state while parallel with it, there exists the other which is founded on the organic continuation of traditions.
Description Control
Archivist's note
Processed by János Dávid, Gábor Havas, János Köllő, Júlia Varga, Krisztina Passuth and Örs Lehel Tari, September 21, 2016.
HU OSA 368-1 Documentation of Sociological Research Projects and Other Works
BookIconSubfonds Description
Context
Hierarchy
Statistics
Identity Statement
Title
Documentation of Sociological Research Projects and Other Works
Identity Statement
Date(s)
1937 - 2010
Identity Statement
Description Level
Subfonds
Identity Statement
Extent and medium (processed)
28 Archival boxes, 3.5 linear meters
Content and structure
Scope and content (abstract)
István Kemény’s academic work started with a paper entitled The Road of Our Peasantry, published under the pen name Áron Máté in 1946. He started to work intensively in the field of social sciences in this period. However, sociology was banned in Hungary in 1948 and Kemény could start working as a sociologist only in 1963. Kemény regarded law scholar Jenő Gyula Pikler (1864-1937), architect Aladár Sós (1887-1975), historian István Hajnal (1892-1956) and sociologist Zoltán Szabó (1912-1984) as his professional “ancestors”, the two first being followers of economist Henry George (1839-1897). Kemény’s choice of land value tax as his topic and individualism as methodology are clear signs of George’s influence. The so-called Kemény School evolved from a series of seminars on methodology, launched in 1969, challenging scientific and public taboos. These seminars were held by Kemény illegally and became an important center of alternative intellectual movements in the late 1970s. News of the events spread rapidly among young intellectuals interested in social sciences and soon attracted the attention of state security organizations. As a result, Kemény definitively lost his post at the Institute of Sociology in 1972, which had been insecure anyway since 1970 because of a speech on poverty at the ceremonial session of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. The seminars took place at different venues and with different audiences. The earliest ones focused on research into the behavior of top managers of enterprises, and were attended by economists Tamás Bauer, Mihály Laki, Aladár Madarász, Károly Attila Soós, philosopher Zoltán Endreffy and sociologist Gyula Kozák. Participants at the later seminars were carefully selected on the basis of professional aptitude. Parallel with a representative research project on the Roma, a study of poverty was conducted; the two grew into one large-scale seminar including participants who were not part of the research projects, for instance sociologists Gábor Havas, Ottilia Solt, Kálmán Rupp, Zsolt Csalog, Péter Galasi, László Kardos, Erika Törzsök, Anna Román, György Göndör, Gabriella Lengyel, Magda Matolay, János Ladányi, Júlia Szalai, János Dávid and Zoltán Zsille. After Kemény’s emigration in 1977 others joined the group of his disciples even though they had never attended the seminars, while sociologists faithful to the regime avoided these meetings, considering them as a training course on how to become a revolutionary. Although this was denied by Kemény, one outcome of the seminars was the establishment of the Foundation for Supporting the Poor in 1979. By 1976 István Kemény was forbidden to conduct any research at all, even under cover of someone else’s name, and he emigrated to Paris in January 1977. He was a researcher at the Écoles des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales from January 1978 to September 1990. In this period he focused on social theory and social history issues, and worked on the publication of the findings of his earlier research projects in Hungarian, English and French. In the 1980s various branches of sociology in Hungary adapted Kemény’s approach to their own topics and after a decade the terms social mobility, poverty, work organization, labor market and second economy made their way into the lexicon of official social sciences. According to some, Kemény broke taboos by pointing out that society has a dual structure: one is forcibly constructed by the state, while parallel with it there exists another which is founded on the organic continuation of traditions. The first series of the sub-fonds includes the documentation of the social stratification research conducted together with Zsuzsa Ferge in 1963. The second series consists of the material of the research project on the living conditions of low income earners. The third series documents the national representative research on the Roma of 1971, 1993 and 2003. The fourth series includes the documents of the research on top managers of enterprises, which was classified for a long period. The fifth series is made up of the documents of sociological and economic research on the living and working conditions of industrial workers. The sixth series includes the transcripts of interviews conducted within the framework of the research project on small entrepreneurs after the regime change. The seventh series is made up of the documents of other research projects, mostly on economic, sociological and historical topics. The most important are the papers on the theory of land value tax based on Henry George’s work, on Jews in the 19th century, and the history of Hungarian society.
Content and structure
Appraisal, destruction and scheduling information
During the course of processing no materials have been removed.
Content and structure
Accruals
Not Expected
Conditions of access and use
Conditions governing access
Not Restricted
Conditions of access and use
Physical characteristics and technical requirements
The series contains paper documents of good physical condition.
Notes
Various branches of sociology in Hungary in the 1980s adopted Kemény’s approach to topics and after a decade the terms social mobility, poverty, work organization, labor market and second economy made their way into the lexicon of official social sciences. According to some, Kemény broke taboos pointing out that society has a dual structure: one is forcefully built by the state while parallel with it, there exists the other which is founded on the organic continuation of traditions.
Description Control
Archivist's note
Processed by János Dávid, Gábor Havas, János Köllő, Júlia Varga, Krisztina Passuth and Örs Lehel Tari, September 21, 2016.